New Year’s Resolution for Healthy Feet

If taking better care of your health is one of your New Year’s resolutions, start from the bottom up. We often don’t think of our foot health until there’s a problem with our feet. This year, promise yourself you’ll take better care of your entire body. Here are a few simple healthy foot habits to stick to in the new year.

Healthy Feet Resolution #1: Walk More

Walking is one of the simplest forms of exercise; it doesn’t require any special equipment, it can be done in almost any weather, and it’s good for your overall health – including your feet. Even in small 15-20 minute doses, walking will help keep your feet and your body in shape.

Healthy Feet Resolution #2: Shed a Few Pounds

If this isn’t already on your New Year’s resolution list, here’s one reason you should consider adding it. Less weight means less stress on feet, which is especially important if you play sports or work on your feet all day. If you’re already at a healthy weight, keep up the good work! Your feet are one step closer to staying healthy in 2015.

Healthy Feet Resolution #3: Have Regular Check-ups

Your feet help you get around even more than your car does, so you should definitely be taking them in for regular check-ups. Regular visits to the podiatrist will let you know if there’s anything you should be paying closer attention to. If you already have a foot condition or other condition that affects your feet (e.g., diabetes), skipping foot check-ups is bad for your health.

Healthy Feet Resolution #4: Eat for Your Feet

What goes in your mouth affects your body – even all the way down to your feet. In general, you should avoid or cut back on foods that cause inflammation in the body. If you have gout, maintaining a healthy eating plan can reduce your symptoms. Once you know which foods to avoid, you can find healthy alternatives that won’t trigger your symptoms.

Healthy Feet Resolution #5: Shape Up Your Shoes

When it comes to improving foot health, 2 quick-fix recommendations for improving your shoe collection are:

Ditch the super high heels and flip-flops. Both of these types of shoes can be hazardous to your foot health. High heels force the foot into an unnatural position, and can damage the foot’s structure, resulting in corns, calluses, and bunions. Flip-flops offer no support for the foot, and the open design leaves your foot more susceptible to injury and infections, like athlete’s foot.
Replace old athletic shoes. Over time, even the best athletic shoe loses its ability to adequately support your feet when you’re engaging in your favorite activity. If you continue wearing them, you could end up throwing off the alignment of your foot. Worn-out shoes also put you at greater risk for sports-related injuries. In the long run, the potential cost of wearing old athletic shoes is much greater than the cost to replace them every 300-500 miles of use.

The path to achieving your New Year’s resolutions awaits you, don’t forget to make sure your feet can take you there. Now’s the perfect time to schedule your New Year’s appointment.

Original Source: http://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-care/best-foot-forward-new-years-resolutions-healthy-feet/

Winter Foot Care Tips to Keep Your Feet Healthy

Whether you’re slogging through deep snow and sub-zero temperatures in the north, or contending with dampness, chill, and muddy conditions in the south, it’s important to take care of your feet all winter long. You’ll want them to be healthy and ready for action when spring finally arrives.
Most Americans will have walked 75,000 miles by the time they turn 50. Is it little wonder, then, that APMA’s 2010 foot health survey found that foot pain affects the daily activities—walking, exercising, or standing for long periods of time—of a majority of Americans?

“Each season presents unique challenges to foot health,” said Matthew Garoufalis, DPM, a podiatrist and APMA president. “Surveys and research tell us that foot health is intrinsic to overall health, so protecting feet all year long is vital to our overall well-being.”

APMA offers some advice for keeping feet healthy in common winter scenarios:

Winter is skiing and snowboarding season, activities enjoyed by nearly 10 million Americans, according to the National Ski Areas Association. Never ski or snowboard in footwear other than ski boots specifically designed for that purpose. Make sure your boots fit properly; you should be able to wiggle your toes, but the boots should immobilize the heel, instep, and ball of your foot. You can use orthotics (support devices that go inside shoes) to help control the foot’s movement inside ski boots or ice skates.

Committed runners don’t need to let the cold stop them. A variety of warm, light-weight, moisture-wicking active wear available at most running or sporting goods stores helps ensure runners stay warm and dry in bitter temperatures. However, some runners may compensate for icy conditions by altering how their foot strikes the ground. Instead of changing your footstrike pattern, shorten your stride to help maintain stability. And remember, it’s more important than ever to stretch before you begin your run. Cold weather can make you less flexible in winter than you are in summer, so it’s important to warm muscles up before running.

Boots are must-have footwear in winter climates, especially when dealing with winter precipitation. Between the waterproof material of the boots themselves and the warm socks you wear to keep toes toasty, you may find your feet sweat a lot. Damp, sweaty feet can chill more easily and are more prone to bacterial infections. To keep feet clean and dry, consider using foot powder inside socks and incorporating extra foot baths into your foot care regimen this winter.

Be size smart. It may be tempting to buy pricey specialty footwear (like winter boots or ski boots) for kids in a slightly larger size, thinking they’ll be able to get two seasons of wear out of them. But unlike coats that kids can grow into, footwear needs to fit properly right away. Properly fitted skates and boots can help prevent blisters, chafing, and ankle or foot injuries. Likewise, if socks are too small, they can force toes to bunch together, and that friction can cause painful blisters or corns.

Finally—and although this one seems like it should go without saying, it bears spelling out—don’t try to tip-toe through winter snow, ice, and temperatures in summer-appropriate footwear. “More than one news show across the country aired images of people in sneakers, sandals, and even flip-flops during the severe cold snap that hit the country in early January,” Dr. Garoufalis said. “Exposing feet to extreme temperatures means risking frostbite and injury. Choose winter footwear that will keep your feet warm, dry, and well-supported.”

Source: APMA

Why Wound Care for Diabetes Patients is So Important

For the 26 million Americas affected by diabetes, and the 1.9 million diagnosed annually, approximately 15 percent of those will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime, a complication that may result in amputation without timely and proper care (66,000 diabetes-related amputations are performed annually).

But when it comes to wound care, especially foot ulcers, many in Contra Costa County, California managing the disease may not realize that there is dedicated center offering help.

“Denial and fear are the major factors as to why those affected hesitate to get the attention they need. Wound Care Services needs to be sought out earlier in their care when we can be of most help,”said Mandy Mori, Director of Wound Care & Hyperbaric Medicine Services with John Muir Health. “Many cannot distinguish how far their wounds have progressed until it is too late.”

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas makes the hormone insulin to help glucose be absorbed into cells.

When a person has diabetes, their body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood.

Tips for wound care: when should treatment for a wound be sought?

Over time, diabetes can cause a lack of sensitivity in the feet. That loss of sensation can lead to cuts and sores going undetected. Diabetes can also diminish blood flow, preventing any foot wounds from properly healing. Taking care of your feet every day will lower the risk of amputation.

Seek out treatment at a wound care center when:

· You have a wound that hasn’t healed in 30 days (commonly experienced by people with diabetes).

· You have a sore with increasing pain, redness or swelling, foul odor, or a change in color.

· You have a surgical wound that has become infected

One way wounds can be cared for is with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a type of medical treatment that works by increasing the amount of oxygen in the blood, stimulating blood flow. It is often used in conjunction with additional therapies to facilitate healing. During hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a patient breathes 100% oxygen inside a special chamber.

At the same time, the pressure surrounding the body is slowly increased to two to three times normal atmospheric pressure.

At John Muir Medical Center, Walnut Creek, hyperbaric oxygen treatments are provided in one-person chambers, allowing for comfortable, private treatment.

Each chamber is constructed using clear plastic material, so a patient can visit with family or friends or even watch TV during treatment. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has many therapeutic benefits, including:

· Greatly increases oxygen concentration in all body tissues

· Shortens the healing time of stubborn wounds

· Stimulates the growth of new blood vessels in areas of reduced circulation

· Enhances white blood cells’ efficiency in killing bacteria and controlling infections

· Preserves skin grafts, flaps, and other tissues where circulation is suddenly reduced

· Reduces swelling (edema)

If you or a loved one is suffering from any of the aforementioned issues relating to diabetes, please contact our staff at We Treat Feet Podiatry (410-363-4343 or info@wetreatfeet.com) as starting treatment early is the key to a full recovery.

Interesting Article on How DPMs are Helping to Rebuild in Haiti

Cool article about how DPMs are helping to rebuild in Haiti, from the blog of Patrick DeHeer DPM written by Fairuz Parvez DPM:

When asked about my experience in Haiti, at first I did not know where to begin. If I were to sum it up in a word, it would be: shocking.

It was eye opening to say the least. I was at a loss for words when I first landed in Haiti. I knew there was some structural destruction but I did not truly understand at what level, the depth of the devastation, and why it was still so. I was as guilty as the next American assuming Haiti was not so bad off. Boy, did I get a crash course in the reality of things there.

The first thing that shook me to my core was just how impoverished the country really was. I have visited developing nations in the past and even there you can find modernized areas with better conditions and buildings that are comparable to those of the west. With Haiti, almost the entire country looks like the ghetto of a developing nation. High rises are almost nonexistent and modern buildings are truly in the minority. Most buildings are primarily plaster or poorly constructed one-floor concrete-ish structures. Then you have the tent cities and makeshift shacks that line the sides of the road.

Yes, I know, I know. You are probably thinking the same thing I was. “Well, what about those innumerable fundraising efforts for millions of dollars by members of Hollywood and various philanthropists? It has been five years since the earthquake. What’s been going on since then?”
The issues with Haiti are more complicated and deeper than just some physical damage to some buildings from the earthquake. If it were that simple, Haiti would have been “fixed” by now. Haiti has been in dire shape since long before the earthquake. If anything, the earthquake was sort of almost a service to the country. It forced the world to pay attention to a country that is so desperately impoverished and functionally broken at the most basic, fundamental levels. The country needs far more than a few well-meaning philanthropists throwing some money at it. That will not solve any problem. The country needs help to establish foundations and basic infrastructure in every field from healthcare to finance to education to agriculture and even to tourism. Without the right kind of help, Haiti will only fall deeper into despair.

As Dr. DeHeer so astutely put, “Haiti is devastatingly endearing.” It truly is. You see people in absolute, abject poverty along the streets in Haiti. Yet there they are, trying to carve out a meager existence, selling their wares. Somehow, they still push forward. Yes, invariably, with international efforts, a culture of dependency has also developed. Nonetheless, this has not completely taken over the psyche of the Haitians. There is great enthusiasm among them when they are afforded an opportunity to learn something new. However, things are still in a fragile state. After my week in Haiti, it us clear that our support is necessary more than ever.

Sure, coming to Haiti and doing a handful or even a large number of surgeries on a mission visit is satisfying, but useless nonetheless. I have always planned to do mission work, knowing it would be part of my practice in the future in some way. But after my visit to Haiti, my entire perspective shifted. Most of my concerns and thoughts seem so insignificant now. I realize I can’t just go to an impoverished country and provide treatment/perform surgeries, and expect to think it made some sort of difference. It is simply not enough.

That old adage “give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime” rings true here. This is the only thing that will truly make a difference in Haiti. We really need give our Haitian colleagues the proper tools (be it medical equipment or medical training) so they can help themselves. Only then can they truly recover and grow.

Now before I give the impression that my trip to Haiti was a bust, let me clarify. It was a great success. The best part of my trip to Haiti was discovering that the organization, Step by Step Haiti, is doing all that and more. It was truly wonderful working alongside our Haitian colleagues. They took our direction and instructions so enthusiastically. They were exceptionally eager to learn what we had to offer. They asked insightful questions and truly try to apply their newfound knowledge to help their fellow citizens. There are real efforts now happening in the communities to educate and reach the average Haitian citizen. They see there is a chance and it is encouraging. It was quite enriching and exciting seeing our colleagues not only treat patients, but be able to demonstrate that they are actively sowing the seeds for preventative care in limb salvage as well.

There is still a long way to go but progress is surely happening. Once these clinics are fully established around the country with appropriate tools and protocols, we hope to establish a Haitian medical residency as a tradition for coming generations.

I am proud to say I have been consumed by my trip to Haiti. I am just getting started and am anxious to do more. All in all, my first trip to Haiti has been truly satisfying. With all of the wreckage I found, I also saw a silver lining. It is with this silver lining that hope springs eternal in the human breast. Hope for a better future for our Haitian brothers and sisters.

Source: Podiatry Today

No Surprise: High Heels Culprit of Most Women’s Foot Issues

The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) today announced the results of its Today’s Podiatrist survey, which measures the public’s attitudes toward foot health. The study, which surveyed 1,000 US adults ages 18 and older, revealed that nearly half of all women (49 percent) wear high heels, even though the majority of heel wearers (71 percent) complain these shoes hurt their feet.

These findings seem to fit the old adage that “beauty is pain.” Even chronic discomfort doesn’t appear to deter women from purchasing the strappy stilettos they love: The average woman who owns high heels has nine pairs! Asked what they do when shoes hurt their feet, 38 percent of women said they’d “wear them anyway if I like them.”

However, in spite of their extensive shoe collections, only two percent of women say they wear high heels every day, and just five percent say they wear high heels five days per week. Almost half say they wear heels rarely or never (46 percent)—which may give them a leg up when it comes to preventing permanent damage to their feet.

“With high heels, moderation is key. It’s best not to wear them every day,” said Matthew G. Garoufalis, DPM, past president of APMA. “Daily heel-wearing can cause the Achilles tendon, the strong tendon at the back of your ankle, to shrink. This increases your risk of an injury while doing activities in flat shoes, including exercise.”

Heel height also plays an important role in preventing foot pain. Almost half of women say they can withstand wearing heels that are three inches or higher, though podiatrists recommend staying more grounded.

“Heel wearers should avoid heels higher than two inches,” said Dr. Garoufalis. “Wearing heels three inches or higher shifts body weight forward, and puts great pressure on the ball of the foot and the toes.”

While high heels were far and away the biggest culprits of foot pain, affecting 71 percent of wearers, women said other types of footwear including barefoot running shoes (27 percent), boots (26 percent), flats (23 percent), and flip flops (23 percent) also caused discomfort.

“Foot pain is never normal, and it’s critical that anyone experiencing chronic pain—from footwear or otherwise—seeks care from an expert,” said Dr. Garoufalis. “We hope these findings encourage Americans to fight foot pain with the help of today’s podiatrist.”

For detailed survey findings and an infographic on high heel pain, visit the APMA website.

The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) is the nation’s leading professional organization for today’s podiatrists. Doctors of Podiatric Medicine (DPMs) are qualified by their education, training, and experience to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle, and structures of the leg. APMA has 53 state component locations across the United States and its territories, with a membership of more than 12,000 podiatrists. All practicing APMA members are licensed by the state in which they practice podiatric medicine. For more information, visit www.apma.org.

REPORT: Office Visits by Patients With Diabetes Rising Rapidly in United States

Office visits in the United States for diabetes rose 20% from 2005 to 2010, with the largest increase in adults in their mid-20s to mid-40s, according to a new data brief from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Nearly 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, putting them at risk for other chronic conditions, such as heart disease, eye disease, and stroke, Jill J. Ashman, PhD, and colleagues from the NCHS note in the brief.

On an annual basis, the cost of diabetes in the United States approaches $245 billion, and patients with diabetes have medical expenditures 2.3 times those of patients without diabetes.

The researchers analyzed recent trends in office visits by patients with diabetes using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative survey of visits to nonfederal office-based physicians (excluding anesthesiologists, radiologists, and pathologists).

They found that office-based physician visits by patients with diabetes rose from 94.4 million in 2005 to 113.3 million in 2010 (a 20% increase). Visits by patients with diabetes made up about 11% of all office-based physician visits in 2010.

The number of office visits increased during the study period for all age groups except for those younger than 25 years. The largest percentage increase (34%) occurred in people in the 25- to 44-year age range.

However, the volume of visits was higher for older adults; individuals aged 65 and older made 53.7 million visits in 2010 compared with 2.6 million visits made by those younger than 25.

The researchers did not see any marked change in the rate of office visits by patients with diabetes in any age group during the study period. The highest rate in 2010 was among those aged 65 and older (1380 visits per 1000 persons) and lowest in those younger than 25 (20 visits per 1000).

“Diabetes is not the only health concern for the majority of patients who have it, with 87% of visits being made by patients who have additional chronic conditions,” Dr. Ashman and colleagues say.

Regardless of age, they found that patients with diabetes use “extensive health resources,” making frequent trips to the doctor and often receiving multiple prescriptions.

One of the federal Healthy People 2020 goals is to reduce the disease and economic burden of diabetes. “Continuing to examine office-based physician visits by patients with diabetes is especially important given changes in standards of care that may influence such visits,” Dr. Ashman and colleagues say.

Source: Medscape

What is driving a physician shortage and how can it be stopped?

As its name insists, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is supposed to give more American access to reasonably-price healthcare, but this affordability would prove fruitless if the number of primary care physicians in the United States continues to decrease.

Recent findings from the likes of SERMO, the largest online community of physicians, show that amongst all provider specialties family and internal medicine are two of three unhappiest groups of physicians, 62 percent and 60 percent, respectively. Only obstetricians and gynecologists come in lower at 59 percent. For internists and family physicians, dissatisfaction with lifestyle was a common factor leading many to rethink their choice of specialty, 25 and 23 percent, respectively.

“These are the doctors on the front lines in medicine who are seeing the increase pressure and in particular now with the ACA in play and a higher stream of patients coming in,” SERMO CEO Peter Kirk tells EHRIntelligence.com. “It is still a challenging work environment and they are at the lower end of the pay scale. Those are the ones looking to change whereas those on the higher end of the pay scale — orthopedists, physiatrists, oncologists, etc. — are happiest with their professions.”

Although these physicians admit to dissatisfaction with their choice of specialty, it does not mean that they are leaving it for another. So then why is this problematic? The answer to that question is seen in the choices made by the next waves of physicians, residents, who are opting more lucrative and less stressful professional positions.

“Based on some of the conversations on the site, you can build a sense of how much there is a drive toward specialty right off,” Kirk explains. “Having your own private practice as a primary care physician is not the dream anymore. It doesn’t pay the bills. There’s too much complexity, too much involved in running a business. This is driving residents into searching for the best-paid specialties in order to help pay of their debt and have a nice head start moving forward.”

Here lies the basis on predictions that physician shortages are only a matter of time. The ACA and increase of insured Americans should only serve to exacerbate the stresses associated with primary care.

“There will not be enough real doctors at the front lines of primary care to handle the workload, especially with the ACA adding 30 million additional patients to the system,” maintains SERMO’s CEO. “More pressure and more of the primary care are being assigned to non-physicians. The NPs and PAs are likely to do more of the work. That’s going to play out over the next five to ten years.”

A solution to the problem?

The physician shortage problem is real, but what can be done about it? Both the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and American Medical Association (AMA) believe the solution to be found in graduate medical education.
Crediting medical schools for increasing enrollments and students for responding with an increasing number of applications, the AAMC is placing the onus on lawmakers:

Now Congress must do its part by lifting the cap on the number of federally supported residency training positions. Lawmakers have responded with proposals in the House and Senate to increase the number of residency positions. But they must act now in order to ensure that there are enough physicians for our growing and aging population.

Meanwhile, the AMA has developed a new policy to encourage state and federal legislators and private payers help fund residents in training with an emphasis on promoting the teaching of team-based and patient-centered care models by accrediting associations.

Through its Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative, the AMA has convened nearly a dozen medical schools to decrease disparities in medical education. “As more patients continue to receive health care coverage, it is essential that the next generation of physicians is sufficiently trained,” said AMA Board Member Stephen Permut, MD.

Health information technology (IT) has a role to play in easing the burdens on providers if developed, implemented, and used properly. But it is still only a support and no substitute for the skill and expertise of physicians using it.

Source:
Kyle Murphy, PhD
EHR Intelligence

New Children’s Foot Health Campaign Kicks Off

April’s foot health awareness month provides APMA the opportunity to educate the general public about the importance of maintaining children’s foot health at all stages of development, and the role today’s podiatrist plays in promoting positive foot health.

This year’s campaign, titled “First Steps: Keeping Kids’ Feet Happy and Healthy”, will provide members with a host of new educational materials, including an online resource page, poster, customizable newsletter, kid-friendly worksheet, and shareable multimedia.

A dedicated media relations strategy targeting “mommy bloggers” will also take place throughout the month, positioning APMA members as experts in the realm of children’s foot health.

The “First Steps” campaign kicks off April 1, and resources will remain on APMA.org for a full year after the campaign’s completion for members’ use. For any questions, or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact the APMA Communications department.

Fashionable Footwear – Good for Style, Bad for Foot Health

More than half of Americans suffer from foot problems, and often those problems are directly related to shoes.

But no matter how cute a shoe looks, Orly Avitzur, medical adviser at Consumer Reports, said that having fashionable footwear isn’t worth the health risks.

“Wearing the wrong shoes can lead to lifelong deformities that require surgery to fix,” she said.

According to a new study from the Institute for Preventive Foot Health, uncomfortable and ill-fitting shoes are a serious problem. Shoes that force feet into narrow or pointy toes can cause bunions or hammertoes, where the toes curl unnaturally downward.

But that doesn’t stop women like Trisha Calvo and Jennifer Frost from wearing name brand heels.

“I feel fabulous in them,” Frost said. “You feel fabulous in your shoes…not physically
fabulous in them.”

Studies show that high heels can shorten your Achilles tendon and can trigger planter fasciitis, an inflammation in the soles of the feet. Avitzur recommends foregoing high heels for something more comfortable.

“Opt for a lower heel to take some of the pressure off the ball of your foot,” she said. “Make sure that there is enough room in the toe, and avoid thin-soled shoes that have little or no support.”

But even flat shoes can hurt feet if they lack proper support and cushioning, especially if they’re the wrong size.

One recent study revealed that up to a third of people wear the wrong shoe size, sometimes by up to one-and-a-half sizes. To combat that problem, Consumer Reports recommends measuring your feet each time you buy, especially for people over 40. After that, feet can grow up to half a shoe size every 10 years.

Source:
WRAL

7 Tips to Take Care of Your Feet This Winter!

Winter’s chill makes it easy to forget about taking care of your feet – but it’s still vitally important! Here are 7 great tips from our friends at Houston’s Diagnostic Foot Specialists that can help stay healthy through the coldest months of the year:

Keep Them Clean

To avoid getting an ingrown toenail, fungus or other unpleasant things on your feet, make sure that you take the time to wash them thoroughly every day. Regular soap and water should work fine, or your foot doctor can give you a few tips about what to use. After washing your feet, take the time to dry them thoroughly before putting on your socks or shoes.

It is also a good idea to soak your feet every now and then, particularly if you are suffering from heel pain or general discomfort. Epsom salt and warm water works well for soaking your feet and can even help ward off infections. Make sure that you do not use extremely hot water, however; this is especially important if your feet are very cold. To help avoid injury, use slightly warm water instead.

When washing your feet, you can take the time to carefully inspect them for ingrown toenails, foot fungus and other issues. If you find any of these problems, consider seeking the assistance of a podiatrist instead of trying to tackle them on your own. At-home remedies often do not work and can even be painful, but a physician can help.

Wear the Right Socks

Before putting on your winter shoes, take a minute to slip on the right pair of socks. Thick, warm socks can help prevent your feet from getting too cold and can keep them dry on snowy and icy days.

Moisturize Regularly

Skin can get very dry during the harsh winter months. Although you might think about using lotion on your arms and hands, however, you might forget about your feet. To help prevent cracking and discomfort, use a rich lotion or foot cream on your clean, dry feet on a daily basis.

Wear the Right Shoes

Wearing the right shoes is very important to prevent injury and to stay as comfortable as possible during the day. Look for shoes that are designed for what you will be using them for; if you will be running, for example, you should look for running shoes. Also, make sure that your shoes offer plenty of arch support; otherwise, you could injure yourself.

Give Them a Rest

Standing all day can be painful and even detrimental to the health of your feet. When possible, sit down and prop up your feet or soak them in a foot bath; giving yourself this rest will help prevent injuries. If you wear high-heeled shoes or other uncomfortable footwear, consider wearing comfortable flats at least a couple of days out of the week; your feet will thank you.

Exercise Your Feet

Before venturing out into the cold, give your feet a bit of exercise; doing so can help you avoid joint pain and other issues. Doing calf exercises, moving your feet in a circular motion and doing leg lifts can help. You do not have to dedicate hours to your exercise routine, but try to get your blood flowing before heading out into the winter weather.

Understand the Importance of Proper Foot Care

Taking care of your feet is important; this is especially true if you are diabetic or suffer from other health-related issues that could affect your feet or legs. Along with following these tips during the winter, make sure that you take good care of your feet all year long. Also, make sure to see a podiatrist if you notice anything wrong with your feet or are in pain.

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